How Many Solar Panels Do I Need for 1000 kWh per Month?

Written By: | Last Updated On: November 21, 2022
How Many Solar Panels Do I Need for 1000 kWh per Month?

With the rising cost of electricity and the advancement of solar panel technology, more and more homeowners are considering solar energy as a way to power their homes.

If you are one of these homeowners, the next question you may have is “How many solar panels do I need for 1000 kWh per month?”

The answer to this question will depend on several factors, including the size of your home, where you live, and the wattage of your solar panels.

But in general, most homeowners will need 30 solar panels in order to generate 1000 kWh per month.

In this blog post, we’ll walk you step by step through the process of estimating how many solar panels you will need to generate 1000 kWh per month.

We will also provide an estimate of how much will this system cost you and how much you can expect to save over time.

So without further ado, let’s get started!

Key Takeaways

  • Theoretically, a 7.4 kW solar system should generate 1000 kWh per month, assuming you get 4.5 peak sun hours per day.
  • Peak sun hours is an estimation of the number of hours where the solar irradiance averages 1,000W/m².
  • You should expect 4-5 peak sun hours per day on average
  • There are solar losses that you need to account for when sizing your system, such as shading and temperature losses.
  • Solar losses are usually 23% of the total energy production.
  • The real life solar system size to generate 1000 kWh per month is 9.1 kW.
  • A 1000 kWh per month solar system consists of 31 300W solar panels.
  • A 1000 kWh per month solar system will cost you about $18,218 and save you more than $31,582 in electricity costs over its lifetime.

How to Calculate the Number of Solar Panels You Need [Step by Step]

1. Electricity Usage

The first step in sizing your solar system is to know how much energy you typically use each month.

This information is usually available on your electricity bill, or you can talk to your utility provider to get an estimate of the amount of energy you consume per month.

In our case, we need 1,000 kWh per month, so we will make our calculations based on that amount.

2. Number of Peak Sun Hours Your Area Receives

Solar panels work by converting sunlight into electricity.

The more sunlight the panels receive, the more energy they will generate.

So in order to properly size your solar system, you must know how many hours of sunlight you receive.

And not any sunlight–you want to know the number of peak sun hours.

Peak sun hours are the number of hours per day when the sunlight intensity is 1,000 watts/m².

Why is this important?

The intensity and angle of the sun will change throughout the day, so it’s not just a matter of how many hours of sunlight you receive.

And peak sun hours is an estimation of how much solar irradiance your panels will get.

You can find the number of peak sun hours your home receives using this tool.

For our example, let’s assume that we have 4.5 peak sun hours per day or 135 per month.

3. Calculate the Theoretical Size of Your Solar System

Now that we know both our average monthly electricity usage (1,000 kWh) and the number of peak sun hours in our area (135), all we need is to perform some simple math to calculate the theoretical size of our solar system.

Solar System Size (kW)= Average Monthly Electricity Usage (kWh) / Number of Monthly Peak Sun Hours in Your Area (h)

So for our example, the theoretical size of our solar system would be 7.4 kW or 7,400 watt solar system.

4. Account for System Losses

A typical solar system has a lot of electrical components and wherever there is a current flowing, there will be some level of power loss.

This means that you need to account for system losses when sizing your solar system.

A typical solar system will have approximately 23% energy losses.

In other words, if your solar panels are generating 1,000kWh per month in theory, the real life power production will be around 762kWh.

Note: This number will vary depending on the quality of your solar array and the weather in your area.

To account for these losses, you simply need to multiply your theoretical solar system size by 1.23.

Real Solar System Size (kW) = Theoretical Solar System Size (kW) x 1.23 (kW)

So for our example, the real size of our solar system would be around 9.1 kW or 9,100 watts.

Solar system losses
Solar system losses

5. Find the Number of Panels

Solar panels are rated by their power output, typically stated in watts.

If a solar panel is rated 300 watts, it simply means that this solar panel will generate 300 watts of power for every peak sun hour (for every hour of 1000W/m² sun irradiance it receives).

So, how many solar panels do I need for 1000kWh per month?

It depends on the wattage of your panels.

Here is how to calculate it:

Number of Solar Panels = Solar System Size (W) / Solar Panel Wattage (W)

So assuming that we are using 300W solar panels, we would need about 31 solar panels (9100/300).

How Much Does a 1000kWh Solar System Cost?

The average price per watt for a residential solar system is around $2.86 (before tax credit,) which means that a 9.1 kW system would cost about $26,026.

So after the 30% federal solar tax credit, the cost would be around $18,218.

Of course, these are just rough estimates, and prices can vary significantly depending on factors like location, installers, and any other applicable incentives but it’s about right for a 1500 square foot house.

How Much Will a 1000kWh Solar System Save Me?

A 1000kWh solar system will save you around $31,582.

Yes, that’s right–over the course of 25 years, a 1000kWh solar system will generate more than $30,000 in electricity savings.

Let’s calculate it together.

Total Electricity Produced (kWh) = Electricity Produced per Month x 12 x Solar System Lifespan (25 years)

Savings ($) = Total Electricity Produced (kWh) x Price per kWh ($) – System Initial Price ($)

The average energy price in the united states is $0.166/kWh.

Your solar system will generate 1000 kWh per month, so that’s $166/month, $1,992/year, and $49,800 over the course of 25 years.

Since we bought the system for $18,218, we will save a total of $31,582 in electricity costs over the course of 25 years.

It’s important to mention that your solar system will degrade, meaning that it will become less efficient at generating electricity over time, so after 10 years, the system might be generating only 900kWh per month instead of 1000kWh.

But since electricity prices are also increasing over time, the savings will still outweigh these losses and you’ll most likely save even more over the course of 25 years.

FAQs

How Many Solar Panels Does It Take To Produce 1000 Watts?

You need 4 250W solar panels to generate 1000 watts per hour.

Of course, you could also go with larger or smaller panels depending on your energy needs.

How Many Solar Panels Do I Need for 1000 kWh per Month in South Africa?

You need 20 400W solar panels to generate 1000 kWh per month in South Africa, assuming you get 5 peak sun hours per day and 23% solar system losses.

How Many kWh per Day Is Normal for Solar?

The average residential solar system produces around 25 kWh per day.

How Many Solar Panels Do I Need for 1200 kWh per Month?

You need 25 400W solar panels to generate 1200 kWh per month, assuming you get 5 peak sun hours per day and 23% solar system losses.

How Much Power Does An Average House Use?

The average house uses about 30 kWh per day or 900 kWh per month.

Can Solar Panels Provide All My Electricity?

Solar panels can easily provide all of your electricity. In fact, some solar systems might even provide more electricity than you need and you’ll end up selling it to the grid for a profit!

Do You Still Have to Pay Bills if You Have Solar Panels?

Yes, you will still have to pay bills if you have solar panels because of the mandatory utility company fees.

How Many Kwh Does a Solar Panel Produce per Month?

A typical 300W solar panel will produce 30.8 kWh per month, assuming it receives 4.5 peak sun hours per day and 23% solar losses.

Last Words

At the end of the day, how many solar panels you need for 1000 kWh per month depends on a variety of factors, such as your location, your energy needs, and the size of your solar system.

If you want to get an accurate estimate of how many solar panels you need for 1000 kWh per month in your specific situation, it’s best to consult with a solar installer or energy expert.

However, most experts agree that for the average home in the US, you will need around 25-30 400W solar panels to generate 1000 kWh per month.

🤞 Subscribe to our newsletter

We don’t spam! don't worry :)

Kami

Leave a Comment